Map Our Shared Past in the Mediterranean

Search

Search using this query type:



Advanced Search (Items only)

Lesson 1.5: Timescales in the Mediterranean and World History

Title

Lesson 1.5: Timescales in the Mediterranean and World History

Subject

Topic 3: When Is the Mediterranean?

Description

This lesson exposes students to Fernand Braudel’s innovative concept of historical scales from the slow pace of environmental and historical changes through the immediate effects of individual actions. It also provides the perspective of contemporary historians of Big History such as David Christian on Braudel’s concept. The lesson helps orient students to the chronological unit of the world era, a global period used in these modules that corresponds to the periodization used in the online curriculum World History For Us All (http://worldhistoryforusall.sdsu.edu).

Creator

Susan Douglass

Source

Our Shared Past in the Mediterranean: A World History Curriculum Project for Educators

Publisher

Ali Vural Ak Center for Global Islamic Studies, George Mason University

Date

2014

Rights

2014, Ali Vural Ak Center for Global Islamic Studies, George Mason University, published under Creative Commons – Attribution-No Derivatives 3.0 License

Duration

1 class period or less for discussion if assigned for homework

Objectives

• Students will identify and explain in simple terms Braudel’s idea of different historical scales

• They will apply the concept of historical scales to events in history, to individual or collective biographies and life stories/trajectories, and in their own lives.

• They will extend this understanding to David Christian’s idea of geography and geology as the largest timescale that affects human activity and places it in context.

• Throughout Modules 1-6, students will be able to apply the concept of historical scales to new information.

Materials

• Student handout 1.3.1

• Writing materials, highlighters

Lesson Plan Text

1. Provide Student Handout 1.3.1 Braudel’s framework of historical scales and (From Braudel, Fernand. The Mediterranean and the Mediterranean World in the Age of Philip II. (Berkeley, Calif: University of California Press, 1995), pp. 20-21 and (From David Christian, “Afroeurasia in Geological Time,” World History Connected, Vol. 5 No. 2 at http://worldhistoryconnected.press.illinois.edu/5.2/christian.html. )

2. To help students decipher these texts through close reading, or active learning, assign students to read the text in a group using “silent discussion-mode.” To do this, project or print a large-text vesrion of the text on a large piece of paper. On this paper, each student can write annotations, comments, and questions (vocabulary, comprehension) on or next next to the part of the text. Alternatively, the teacher can create questions or highlight passages for comment, and students write their answers/ideas next to these passages. The teacher may observe the notations and comment as well by writing on the paper. This can be a timed activity followed by discussion of the notations and questions students made.

Files

Citation

Susan Douglass, “Lesson 1.5: Timescales in the Mediterranean and World History,” Our Shared Past in the Mediterranean: Teaching Modules , accessed September 19, 2018, http://mediterraneansharedpast.org/items/show/6.

Document Viewer

Social Bookmarking