Map Our Shared Past in the Mediterranean

Search

Search using this query type:



Advanced Search (Items only)

Lesson 5.8: Scripting/Enacting a Salon Session

Title

Lesson 5.8: Scripting/Enacting a Salon Session

Subject

Topic 6: Women’s Empowerment and the Tradition of the Salon

Description

Topic Overview

In this lesson students are divided into groups of salonniers and their guests (up to eight groups).  In their groups they plan a salon session to enact in front of class. They research and imagine the historical context  of a salon session, the cast of characters, and the setting.  Students are then assigned to write an actual script  and/or make plans for an adlibbed conversation in the “salon” for presentation to the entire class. 

Lesson Overview

In this lesson students are divided into groups of salonniers and their guests (up to eight groups). In their groups they plan a salon session to enact in front of class. They research and imagine the historical context of a salon session, the cast of characters, and the setting. Students are then assigned to write an actual script and/or make plans for an adlibbed conversation in the “salon” for presentation to the entire class.

Creator

Joan Brodsky Schur

Source

Our Shared Past in the Mediterranean: A World History Curriculum Project for Educators

Publisher

Ali Vural Ak Center for Global Islamic Studies, George Mason University

Date

2014

Rights

2014, Ali Vural Ak Center for Global Islamic Studies, George Mason University, published under Creative Commons – Attribution-No Derivatives 3.0 License

Duration

Two 45-50 minute class periods to implement Lesson 5.7 (Part 1 of the Salons activity) An additional three class periods for Lesson 5.8, (Part 2 of the Salons activity)

Standards

• National Curriculum Standards for Social Studies, National Council for the Social Studies Theme 5 High School: How various forms of groups and institutions change over time; How groups and institutions work to meet individual needs, and can promote the common good and address persistent social issues.

• National Standards of History, National Center for History in the Schools. Era 7, 4B Analyze connections between reform movements and industrialization, democratization, and nationalism. Explain the origins of women’s suffrage and other movements in Europe and North America and assess their successes up to World War I.

Objectives

• Students will define the term salon as it applies across history and cultures.

• They will analyze how women gained public influence via the salons held in their homes.

• They will compare women’s movements within regions of the Mediterranean to those outside of it.

• They will enact and embody viewpoints held by men and women who attended the salons.

Materials

Student Handouts 5.7.4 to 5.7.8 (see Lesson 5.7 for Student Handouts 5.7.1-5.7.3 if not implemented)

  • 5.7.4 Salon members plan their salons (guided group work)
  • 5.7.5 Individual assignments for salon members
  • 5.7.6 Graphic organizer: How nationalism, industrialization and the women’s movements intersected.
  • 5.7.7 Some conversation topics, primary source readings and questions
  • 5.7.8 Salon Biographies (readings)

Lesson Plan Text

1. Assign Roles: The teacher assigns the roles of the salonniers. Choose students who are ready to play a leadership role in organizing other students-cum-guests and in leading the discussion, much as the salonniers actually did themselves. The salons met in their homes; it was through their social connections and intellectual accomplishments that their salons gained a following of distinguished men and women. Note that the readings in this lesson provide background information for the salons held in Cairo, Aleppo and Damascus, but not Paris and Milan. However, with good student researchers you can assign some to represent the salonniers in Paris (Geneviève Halevy Straus) and Milan (Anna Kuliscioff).

2. Assign other class members to be invited guests for each salon. You can assign each one to play a particular guest, or let students choose from Student Handout 5.7.8: Salon Biographies.

3. Distribute student handouts and provide work time: Provide a class period in which salon groups organize their salons. Distribute Handout 5.7.4: Salon members plan their salons and Handout 5.7.5: Individual Assignments for Salon Members.

4. Optional: Distribute Student Handout 5.7.6 Graphic Organizer of intersecting social movements and Student Handout 5.7.7 Conversation Topics. Ask students to enter facts and ideas onto Student Handout 5.7.6 as they read from the Conversation Topics.

5. Devote a second class to having students script their salon. Note that historians do not have “transcripts” of salon sessions, but infer what these were like based on references to them in letters, novels, and newspaper articles.

6. Third class period: Students enact their salons in front of the entire class.

7. Debriefing: Focus on Handout 5.7.6: Graphic Organizer of intersecting social movements. Pose the following question for debate: To what extent was it necessary for women to enter the public sphere in order to build successful national movements? Could women have entered the public sphere without new technologies that enabled them to write for public consumption?

8. For discussion and debate: To what extent was the Nahdah movement literary and to what extent nationalist? To what other linguistic revivals could it be compared? What was the role of men in the salons? Were women always in the vanguard of pushing social change for women, or was it sometimes the men? Could women have succeeded in entering more prominent public roles without the support of men? Explain. Which of the salonniers in your classroom was most successful in nurturing vigorous discussion in an even-handed and calm manner? In which of the salons were the guests most impressive in their ability to present their talents and share their viewpoints?

Files

Citation

Joan Brodsky Schur, “Lesson 5.8: Scripting/Enacting a Salon Session,” Our Shared Past in the Mediterranean: Teaching Modules , accessed November 23, 2017, http://mediterraneansharedpast.org/items/show/53.

Social Bookmarking