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Lesson 3.5: Houses of Worship and Places of Veneration

Title

Lesson 3.5: Houses of Worship and Places of Veneration

Subject

Topic 5: What Does Religion Have to Do With It?

Description

This lesson explores modes of worship and religious tolerance during the medieval era. Students explore the role of religion in the Mediterranean during the period and analyze evidence of religious tolerance and shared artistic development throughout the region.

Creator

Tom Verde

Source

Our Shared Past in the Mediterranean: A World History Curriculum Project for Educators

Publisher

Ali Vural Ak Center for Global Islamic Studies, George Mason University

Date

2014

Rights

2014, Ali Vural Ak Center for Global Islamic Studies, George Mason University, published under Creative Commons – Attribution-No Derivatives 3.0 License

Duration

Lesson takes one 45-50 minute class period, longer if additional research is assigned.

Objectives

• Students will describe common elements between physical spaces of worship among Christians and Muslims

• They will identify sites that were used in common by worshippers of different faiths

• They will describe shared religious practices and concepts such as prayer and pilgrimage to holy sites across traditions

Materials

• Student Handout 3.5.1 – Religious Tolerance and Houses of Worship

Lesson Plan Text

1. Distribute or project Student Handout 3.5.1, “Religious Tolerance and Houses of Worship” on an LCD projector or Smartboard. Have the students read the handout text and consider the questions at the bottom of the handout.

2. If time permits, students may research further examples of shared religious spaces, practices such as pilgrimage, fasting, prayer and architectural commonalties. For example, the Dome of the Rock in Jerusalem also contains Byzantine mosaics that express Muslim views of Jesus. Stained glass windows such as those built into the cathedrals of Chartres and Notre Dame have roots in Byzantine and Syrian glass staining traditions, and owe much to the geometric tesselations of Islamic art. (See http://islamicspain.tv/Arts-and-Science/The-Culture-of-Al-Andalus/Glass.htm)

Files

Citation

Tom Verde, “Lesson 3.5: Houses of Worship and Places of Veneration,” Our Shared Past in the Mediterranean: Teaching Modules , accessed August 17, 2018, http://mediterraneansharedpast.org/items/show/18.

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