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Lesson 3.4: What Does It Take to Make a Book?

Title

Lesson 3.4: What Does It Take to Make a Book?

Subject

Topic 3: Ideas in Motion

Description

This lesson identifies for students how the introduction of paper impacted the Mediterranean and the central role of books and writing in its culture. It also covers the way in which books were used in schools and how pupils learned, including children and women.

Creator

Tom Verde

Source

Our Shared Past in the Mediterranean: A World History Curriculum Project for Educators

Publisher

Ali Vural Ak Center for Global Islamic Studies, George Mason University

Date

2014

Rights

2014, Ali Vural Ak Center for Global Islamic Studies, George Mason University, published under Creative Commons – Attribution-No Derivatives 3.0 License

Duration

Lesson will take 1-2 class periods, depending on the use of optional readings.

Objectives

• Students will be able to describe the advantages of paper over other writing materials and explain its significance in terms of broadening literacy

• They will identify the purposes of literacy during the medieval period and the social classes who enjoyed access to literacy and books.

• They will analyze visual representations of books and reading to draw conclusions about the social context of reading

Materials

• PowerPoint Presentation 3.4, “What Does It Take to Make a Book?”

• Student Handout 3.4.1 – Literacy

• Student Handout 3.4.2 – Optional readings 1-3

Lesson Plan Text

1. Students will view PowerPoint presentation 3.4, which includes videos on the making of books, and read texts concerning literacy during the medieval period

2. Show PowerPoint 3.4, “What Does It Take to Make a Book?” or have students view it on their own in a flipped classroom model. Discuss how books were made, the importance of paper, and how books were used, during the era. In what ways was this technology different from what came before it in terms of cost, durability, wide dissemination of ideas (e.g. scrolls on parchment, papyrus and hard writing materials)

3. Distribute or project Student Handouts 3.4.1-3.4.2 and have students read and reflect on the questions at the end of each segment. In addition, students should closely view the images to discover clues about the social context of reading and books.

4. Optional reading: Jonathan Bloom, “Revolution by the Ream: A History of Paper,” Saudi Aramco World magazine, May/June 1999 at http://www.saudiaramcoworld.com/issue/199903/revolution.by.the.ream-a.history.of.paper.htm.

Files

Citation

Tom Verde, “Lesson 3.4: What Does It Take to Make a Book?,” Our Shared Past in the Mediterranean: Teaching Modules , accessed October 18, 2018, http://mediterraneansharedpast.org/items/show/16.

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