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Lesson 3.3: Trade Routes: Goods and Ideas in Motion

Title

Lesson 3.3: Trade Routes: Goods and Ideas in Motion

Subject

Topic 2: Trade: What Does It Take to Run a Business?

Description

This lesson identifies for students the expanding trading networks across the Mediterranean during this period, highlighting their importance as centers of material as well as intellectual and technological exchange.

Creator

Tom Verde

Source

Our Shared Past in the Mediterranean: A World History Curriculum Project for Educators

Publisher

Ali Vural Ak Center for Global Islamic Studies, George Mason University

Date

2014

Rights

2014, Ali Vural Ak Center for Global Islamic Studies, George Mason University, published under Creative Commons – Attribution-No Derivatives 3.0 License

Duration

Lesson will take two to four 45-50 minute class periods.

Objectives

• Students will examine maps showing trade routes and major trading cities during the module timeframe, making connections between sources and markets.

• They will also identify commodities traded and associate some of them with locations on the trade routes

• They will explore modern economic concepts such as trade deficits and supply/demand and relate them to the medieval Mediterranean flow of trade goods.

• They will analyze primary source accounts of trade during the period and characterize the variety of goods being traded and the multi-cultural/multi-national dimensions of trade in the region.

Materials

• Student Handout 3.3.1, Introduction to Trade Routes: Goods and Ideas in Motion

• Student Handout 3.3.2, “The West-East Trade Deficit: Who Controlled the Flow of Goods and Cash”

• Student Handout 3.3.3, “Towns and Trade Route Maps”

Lesson Plan Text

1. Distribute Student Handout 3.3.1, “Introduction to Trade Routes: Goods and Ideas in Motion.” Have the students read the handout, then ask them to consider and identify commodities and consumer goods in modern times.

2. Have the students read Student Handout 3.3.2, “The West-East Trade Deficit: Who Controlled the Flow of Goods and Cash. ” and ask them to identify the aspects of medieval and modern market forces that are common. Then have them continue to read the selections in the handout, which detail who was involved in trading, and what specific goods were traded.

3. Prepare and distribute or display Student Handout 3.3.3 on – Towns and Trade Route Maps during various time periods, and have students complete the activities associated with each map, either in class or as homework, individually or in groups.

Files

Citation

Tom Verde, “Lesson 3.3: Trade Routes: Goods and Ideas in Motion,” Our Shared Past in the Mediterranean: Teaching Modules , accessed January 19, 2018, http://mediterraneansharedpast.org/items/show/15.

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