Map Our Shared Past in the Mediterranean

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Module 4: Mediterranean Transformations in a Changing Global Context, 1450-1800

Title

Module 4: Mediterranean Transformations in a Changing Global Context, 1450-1800

Description

This period in history sees the expansion of European states into the Indian Ocean and across the Atlantic to the New World, and these enormous changes have tended to make many assume that the Mediterranean became, quite literally, a backwater. The Mediterranean has also been seen as the dividing line between East and West, across which Muslim and Christian civilizations struggled for dominance. The topics in Module 4, which covers the early modern period from 1450-1800, reveal a more complex reality. While Europeans were sailing around Africa and discovering the New World, the Mediterranean actually remained an important locus of trade, politics, and culture. And while there was certainly conflict between Muslims and Christians, there were also alliances across religious lines and a whole lot of division and fighting within each of those broad faith groups. In this module, students will trace a variety of connections and tensions across the societies of the Mediterranean. Students will create their own attack ads as they debate the ideas of golden age and decline with reference to Hapsburg Spain and the Ottoman Empire, and map a number of Mediterranean movers and shakers as they criss-cross the region for trade, pilgrimage, war, and exploration. They will look at Mediterranean economies as they create, trade and consume commodities like sugar, coffee and silk—as well as enslaved human beings. They will also look at a cosmopolitan Mediterranean city through time, and examine the various peoples that made the city of Salonica tick.

Creator

Barbara Petzen

Source

Our Shared Past in the Mediterranean: A World History Curriculum Project for Educators

Publisher

Ali Vural Ak Center for Global Islamic Studies, George Mason University

Date

2014

Rights

2014 Ali Vural Ak Center for Global Islamic Studies, George Mason University, published under Creative Commons – Attribution-No Derivatives 3.0 License 

Items in the Module 4: Mediterranean Transformations in a Changing Global Context, 1450-1800 Collection

Teachers’ Introduction to Module 4 A generation ago, historians might have seen the Mediterranean as a dividing line between civilizations, the West and Islam. However, the period from 1450-1800 clearly demonstrates that the Mediterranean connected…

Topic Overview At the beginning of this period in 1450, two great empires were forming at either end of the Mediterranean: Spain and the Ottoman Empire. The Ottomans under Mehmet II were poised to conquer Constantinople and put an end to the last…

Topic Overview The purpose of this topic is to engage students in analysis of the ways in which individuals and groups experienced the expansion and competition of empires in this period, and to examine how those individual experiences can shed light…

Students will compare several historical maps of the period, including: • Carta Catalana, 1452 • Mürsiyeli İbrahim Efendi’s 1461 map of the Mediterranean • Henricus Martellus Germanus’ 1490 world map • Piri Reis’ 1513 world map…

Students will research a set of individuals whose life stories reflect themes of movement, imperial competition, trade, piracy, slavery, etc. and then create geo-biographies on an online map. Each working group of students will plot at least 4-5…

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