Map Our Shared Past in the Mediterranean

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Module 2: The Mediterranean and Beyond in Antiquity

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Module 2: The Mediterranean and Beyond in Antiquity

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Lessons in this module highlight numerous important developments that diffused into or from regions adjacent to the Mediterranean: horse riding and the wheel, food crops and spices, and three important language groups and writing systems, for example. Other lessons trace the expansion of trade networks and the cultural exchange they made possible in the arts of living, religion, war and statecraft. A lesson on Carthage and a bridge lesson on empires explore the phenomenon of empire building and how it affected power relations and ordinary people as boundaries shifted through warfare and diplomacy. The central theme of all the lessons is the scope of the Mediterranean during this period. The broad questions they pose are, “What lands and people are in contact within and beyond the shores of the Mediterranean?” and “What impact did these contacts have in creating new possibilities and challenges?”

Items in the Module 2: The Mediterranean and Beyond in Antiquity Collection

Teachers’ Introduction to Module 2 Geographic scope: “Where is the Mediterranean” in this period? This question refers to the question of what areas around and adjacent to the Mediterranean Sea during this period impacted the life of its…

The lesson describes the so-called Mediterranean Diet, its history and significance in the modern era, and traces the history and geography of the foods and culture of which it is made, beginning with the defining role played by olive, date, grape,…

Students use primary sources in the form of texts and objects from excavations of Bronze Age sources from the second to the first millennium BCE—the Uluburun shipwreck, the port city of Ugarit, and a passages from the Hebrew Bible and other ancient…

This lesson traces the origins and diffusion of three major developments and innovations, in transportation, metallurgy, and language, and describes how historians have explored the evidence of their development and movement beyond their origins.…

This lesson gives students insights into the importance of Carthage and its connections with peoples and powers in the Mediterranean from its founding as a Phoenician colony to its defeat by the Romans, its reconstruction, and final disappearance as…

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